The mission of the Northfield Historical Society is to connect individuals to the history

of the Northfield area by collecting, preserving, and sharing its unique stories.

Visit Us

 

 408 Division Street

Northfield, MN 55057

Phone number: 507-645-9268

Fax number: 507-663-6080

 

Winter Hours

Monday    By Appointment Only

Tuesday     12 pm to 4 pm

Wednesday   12 pm to 4 pm

Thursday   10 am to 4 pm

Friday        10 am to 4 pm

Saturday    10 am to 4 pm

Sundays    By Appointment Only

   

  Admission

$5 – Adults

$4 – Seniors (65+)

$3 – Students

$2 – Children (6 to 12)

Free – Children under 6

Free – NHS Members

See Prohibition Party Details on the Programs and Events Page

2021 Calendar

March           20 – Prohibition Party (Annual Spring Fundraiser)

April              1—Summer Hours Begin

June               TBD—Cemetery Stories presented by SCOPE

                       Raid Walking Tours

                       TBD – Adventures of John North program  begins

August           TBD—Adventures of John North program  ends

September    8-12—DJJD

                        12—Outlaw Run 5K/15K Run-Walk

 

Book the History Hideout for Spring Break!

The History Hideout is available for DAILY reservations throughout spring break, March 21 – March 28 for the price of regular admission! Make a reservation by calling 507-645-9268 or by emailing osterman@ northfieldhistory.org. Reservations must be made for spring break dates at least a day ahead of the reservation. 

Funding for the History Hideout was provided by the Minnesota Humanities Council through the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) as part of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act economic stabilization plan.

 

 

Follow Us on Facebook!

Time to reveal this week's #WhatsitWednesday item! This week's mystery object is a can of survival biscuits, packaged late in 1962! Sealed for freshness, food and other survival items such as these were available for civil defense during the Cold War. After World War II the United States and the Soviet Union competed to be the top superpower in the world in terms both economic and military strength. This lead to a nuclear arms race that at its peak, caused most cities and towns in the U.S. to have designated fallout shelters in the event of nuclear attack. Many building in the United States still have a fallout shelter sign attached. Much less common are shelter items such as these. Thanks for playing, check back next week for another Whats-it Wednesday! ... See MoreSee Less
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It's #WhatsitWednesday! Guess what this item is in the comments, check back later to find out what this is! ... See MoreSee Less
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It's time to reveal this week's #WhatsitWednesday item! This week's item is a butter mold. Typically hand-carved out of wood, butter molds were used by farmers to put an identifying stamp on their butter, similar to how lumber companies stamped logs with an identifier. The unique designs in the mold was designed to show potential buyers that the butter they were buying was a quality product. The ornate designs were not just for looks, but served as a trademark to help purchasers identify the butter they liked best. Thanks for playing, check back next week for another Whats-it Wednesday! ... See MoreSee Less
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It's #WhatsitWednesday! Here is this week's mystery item, leave your guesses in the comments and check back later to find out what this is! ... See MoreSee Less
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NHS is excited to present our first book on the 1876 raid translated into Spanish! The book was written by NHS tour guide Richard Waters and translated by NHS board member Anita Sasse. Funding was provided by the MN Humanities Center through the National Endowment for the Humanities as part of the CARES Act economic stabilization plan. Minnesota Humanities Center National Endowment for the Humanities #NEHcares #NEHGrant #historymatters ... See MoreSee Less
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What Visitors Are Saying about the Northfield Historical Society

Visited with teenagers. They enjoyed the variety of explanations including a video orientation. Well done! Great restoration and presentation of a time after the Civil War when times were still turbulent.
Richard J., Gainesville, Georgia

We really enjoyed seeing this museum. They kept the actual bank part of it as it was when Jesse James and friends tried to abscond with the money. The film was very informative and we left feeling that we well understood what took place.
Kelly B.

Certainly worth the $5 admission…The young lady who walked us through the bank was a high school student who volunteers at the museum, She did a better job as a storyteller relating the events than many adults…
Trip Advisior

Three of the four of us [on the tour] are James historians, with one of us a person who works at the James Farm and two of us are James writers. We found the tour to be accurate and well done by our tour guide.
Elizabeth J. Lexington, Missouri

The Historical Society was very well done. There was a $5.00 entry fee and it was worth it. We watched a film on Jesse James and read more about him. It also had a room describing Malt o Meal. It’s worth the stop.
Via Trip Advisor

This is not your typical “any town” Historical Society Museum…
Annie T. - Yelp